Sociology: How do we usually define this crime, and what stories do we usually tell about it? Part II Then, consider how these two short stories transform that usual understanding of rape. What do they change?

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Each module has to be about 200 words. Writing modules Model 1 I’ll reiterate the trigger warning again here. Please think carefully about everyone’s feelings and the seriousness of the topic when you write your responses. Part I : Angela Carter and Margaret Atwood both use fantasy to rewrite rape narratives. Using your own knowledge of our culture, the background narratives of the stories, and Rubin’s discussion of the traffic in women, briefly explain the construction of rape in our culture. How do we usually define this crime, and what stories do we usually tell about it? Part II Then, consider how these two short stories transform that usual understanding of rape. What do they change? How do those changes force us to rethink and reinterpret the meaning of rape? As possible starting points, you might consider the contention that rape is a crime about power rather than sex (which connects us back to Rubin) as well as the #metoo movement. Sex, Fantasy, and the Traffic in Women— model 2 various ways, many of the poems and stories we’ve read challenge the fundamental patriarchal relationship identified by Gayle Rubin’s “The Traffic in Women.” This discussion will aim to pick this apart a bit more thoroughly Part I : Rubin suggests that the traffic in women makes socially mandated heterosexual relationships necessarily oppressive. For two poems, explain how they demonstrate, critique, and resist the construction of love relationships under patriarchy (we’ll grant the assumption that everything we’re reading in this class was written under patriarchy). Rethinking marriage- model 3 Rhys’s novel, Wide Sargasso Sea, creates a backstory for Bertha Mason, the madwoman in the attic from Jane Eyre, as well as Rochester. In doing so, the novel forces us to rethink the marriage narratives from the earlier novel. For example, we never got Bertha’s version of events of her courtship and marriage in the original text, only Rochester’s rather tortured and self-serving description (after all, he’s trying to convince Jane to stay with him), which is in turn filtered through Jane’s perceptions (after Bertha has already tried to set her on fire at least once). Wide Sargasso Sea gives Bertha, known as Antoinette in this novel, the voice she never had in Bronte’s story–presenting us with an alternative portrayal of the emotional, social, and economic relationship represented by the first Rochester union. Not only does the story give voice to a previously nearly voiceless character, it also places her story of a forced marriage for economic gain alongside the history of slavery in the islands. Add to this the arguments that Rubin makes about the traffic in women, and we get a powerful critique of the romance and marriage plot that dominates most of Jane Eyre. Part I: What do you think the novel says about marriage, and its place in women’s lives? What questions does it raise for you about Jane Eyre, and how might you begin to answer those questions? Be SPECIFIC–draw on particular passages and quotations from Rhys, Bronte, and Rubin to substantiate your discussion and support your viewpoints. Readings: Sex, Marriage, and Motherhood. This module: sex (love?), the good, the bad, and the ugly– I don’t normally give trigger warnings, but consider yourself warned this time around. Read the following poems: Wroth, Mary. [Late in the forest I did Cupid see] (Norton 1, 108) Behn, Aphra. “On Her Loving Two Equally” and “To the Fair Clarinda, Who Made Love to Me, Imagined More than Woman” (Norton 1, 184-5) Taggard, Genevieve. “With Child” (Norton 2, 495) Rukeyser, Muriel. “Night Feeding” (Norton 2, 647) brooks, gwendolyn. “the mother” (Norton 2, 781) Beer, Patricia. “Brunhild” (Norton 2, 884) Lorde, Audre. “Now That I Am Forever with Child” (Norton 2, 1072) Clifton, Lucille. “the lost baby poem” (Norton 2, 1120) Boland, Eavan. “Against Love Poetry (Norton 2, 1295) Fiction: Atwood, Margaret. “Rape Fantasies” (Norton 2, 1210-17). Carter, Angela. “The Company of Wolves” (Norton 2, 1221-8). A retelling of Little Red Riding Hood (part of Carter’s collection of feminist fairy tale rewrites, The Bloody Chamber) Butler, Octavia. “Bloodchild” (Norton 2, 1307-20). This is a science fiction story about male pregnancy on an alien planet. Rhys, Jane. Wide Sargasso Sea (novel) Nonfiction/Criticism Rubin, Gayle. “The Traffic in Women.” Rubin Traffic in Women.pdf preview.png This is a long article which focuses on political economy (women as a form of capital) and anthropological kinship theory. Rubin is an anthropologist. Here she combines elements of Marxist economic theory, Levi-Strauss’s kinship theory, and the psychoanalytical criticism of Freud and Lacan in order to examine how women serve as objects of exchange which mediate the relationships between men in patriarchal culture. Sexual relationships and exchanges, according to Rubin, are fundamental to the construction of society–particularly patriarchy–and the ways in which they have been constructed form the basis of sexual oppression built on the use of women as cultural capital.

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